(The word and (positive) experience of) ‘Silence.

Where emotions exist, but don’t prevail.Image

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01gnq8y/Start_the_Week_Creativity_Jonah_Lehrer/

Andrew Marr discusses creativity with science writer Jonah Lehrer, experimental sound artist Scanner, nano-scientist Rachel O’Reilly and author Joanna Kavenna.

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‘His second insight is that the ability to be creative, to think new thoughts, is crucially dependent on one’s relationships with other people and society as a whole. This is because the individual brain, “is always situated in a context and a culture” which may either discourage or support a person’s creativity.

  • Taking a break from struggling is helpful, in part, because it allows the brain to produce more alpha waves, which are associated with spontaneous insights. So crucial are these waves that, “it’s possible to predict that a person will solve an insight puzzle up to eight seconds before the insight” reaches that person’s conscious mind.
  • Going for a walk or talking with friends at a café can also free one’s mind to wander and lead to unexpectedly useful associations. A person who is in a more relaxed mood may become more intuitive as his or her thoughts break free from their habitual patterns. (The down-side, however, as Daniel Kahneman explains in his brilliant, Thinking, Fast and Slow, is that, when in a good mood, a person also has a tendency to be “less vigilant and prone to logical errors.”)
  • Imagine helps to demystify creativity, to show how we can break through old patterns of thinking, and how much society can help — or hinder — us in achieving our creative potentials.

How Creativity Works, Jonah Lehrer

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Creativity+more+social+than+think+author+argues/6895212/story.html#ixzz1zseo1GBt

Creativity, Psychology